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Alain Giguère

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The political climate in Quebec, November 2016

Categories: CROP in the news

Posted on 11-23-16 at 1:05 p.m.

The results of CROP’s latest monthly survey on the political climate in Quebec are hot off the press. The survey was conducted from November 16th to 21th, 2016 among 1000 panel respondents.

Click here for detailed survey results – FRENCH ONLY

Click here to read the related article in La Presse - FRENCH ONLY

By CROP

The political climate in Quebec, October 2016

Categories: CROP in the news

Posted on 10-18-16 at 1:09 p.m.

The results of CROP’s latest monthly survey on the political climate in Quebec are hot off the press. The survey was conducted from October 12th to 17th, 2016 among 1000 panel respondents.

Click here for detailed survey results – FRENCH ONLY

Click here to read the related article in La Presse - FRENCH ONLY

By CROP

Corporations & social responsibility - It all begins at home!

Categories: Food for thought

Posted on 09-28-16 at 1:30 p.m.

For many, the notion of corporate social responsibility primarily evokes the redistribution of wealth in communities, associations and charitable causes, or environmental-protection projects. But one of the main findings of the latest CROP study on this issue leads to a more nuanced conclusion.

For consumers and citizens alike, corporate social responsibility begins with the manufacturing process, the supply chain, the impact that companies have on society and the environment. The commitment to causes, while considered very important, comes second.

A large majority of Canadians expect companies, above all, to treat their employees well, to sell products and services (and those of their suppliers) that pose no danger to people's health or the environment. They also expect companies to adhere to the highest standards of quality and ethics in their practices, wherever they are located.

Canadians are clearly segmented based on their expectations of corporate social responsibility. More than one out of two Canadians want to see companies demonstrate leadership in this area and say that how a company performs in this respect influences their purchasing decisions and choices.

Idealists, for example, have characteristics reminiscent of the alter-globalization movement. They are very ecological. They want wealth to be shared more “equitably”. They believe that their dream of a better world for everyone can be realized. While highly critical of companies, they believe that it is possible to collaborate with them. Because they are very connected and active on social media, they can potentially make a lot of “noise”—both bad and good!—that affects a company’s reputation.

Consequently, brands, companies and institutions need to ensure that the “consumers” belonging to the segments most sensitive to the issue of corporate social responsibility are favourably disposed toward them. Yet, according to our brand studies, this is not always the case!

Is your brand properly positioned on this issue? CROP can help you find out.

By CROP

The political climate in Quebec, September 2016

Categories: CROP in the news

Posted on 09-22-16 at 4:08 p.m.

The results of CROP’s latest monthly survey on the political climate in Quebec are hot off the press. The survey was conducted from September 15th to 19th, 2016 among 1000 panel respondents.

Click here for detailed survey results – FRENCH ONLY

Click here to read the related article in La Presse - FRENCH ONLY

By CROP

The political climate in Quebec, February 2016

Categories: CROP in the news

Posted on 02-23-16 at 1:05 p.m.

THE MOOD IN QUEBEC

Since the 2008 financial crisis, Quebecers have been feeling downright morose. Moreover, although we note some signs of resilience, the state of mind of Quebecers is very similar to that of a depressed person: fatalism, a feeling of lack of empowerment in life, low vitality, etc. At first, the election of Justin Trudeau’s Liberal Party brought a real breath of fresh air.  This spurt was all too brief and the drag towards depression has returned. As was the case before October 2015, the majority of Quebecers get the impression that the province is going in the wrong direction.

PROVINCIAL POLITICS

Our monthly update indicates that the level of satisfaction with the provincial government is around 40%, and has been at that level for a few months. Our counterparts at Léger measure the level of satisfaction at around 30%. How can this variance be explained?

At CROP, we measure the government’s performance without referring to the party or its leader. Our fellow pollsters evaluate the performance by personalizing the measure and naming the party and the leader.

Therefore, one out of ten Quebecers (the difference between 40% and 30%) approve of the provincial government’s actions, but don’t like its representatives. In marketing-speak, we would say that they have confidence in the brand’s equity, but they don’t identify with the brand’s personality.

Companies such as Bell or McDonald’s “suffer” from the same syndrome. Favourability towards them is weak, but their sales are very strong. People don’t identify with the brand, but they consume it.

The question on level of satisfaction with the government allows us to measure the size of market change. Before choosing a party, voters ask themselves if they would re-elect the current government or not. For this 10%, the issue is: “Will I vote for the Liberal Party led by Philippe Couillard because I believe they are competent, or will I vote for another party because I don’t like them and what they represent?”

For the complete results, click here (French only).

By CROP